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Reclaiming Links to Your Infographics & Creative Commons Images

There are lots of ways to acquire links to your website by using infographics and Creative Commons-licensed content. But the real question is, how many people are actually linking back to you when they use your content on their website? If you have created great content that you share with others in exchange for a…

There are lots of ways to acquire links to your website by using infographics and Creative Commons-licensed content. But the real question is, how many people are actually linking back to you when they use your content on their website? If you have created great content that you share with others in exchange for a backlink, be sure that you’re really getting those backlinks by trying these simple strategies.

Get Links for Your Infographics on Other Sites

Most people who embed your infographics on their website will do so using the title of the infographic itself. Take these infographics by KISSmetrics. If I run a search for the title of one of their infographics – “How Online Marketing Drives Offline Success” infographic – I’ll get 12,300+ results.

I’ll admit, going through that many results sounds like a tedious task. But it really depends on how serious you are about getting links to your content. Out of the first 20 search results, I found:

  • 5 sites using the infographic without a credit link to the source.
  • 2 sites using the infographic with a credit link, but not to the appropriate source.

That’s 7 links that KISSmetrics should be getting thanks to their infographic, but they simply are not. And that’s just in the first 20 search results which only took a few minutes to go through.

How to Optimize Infographics for Link Building

What’s missing from a link building standpoint on the KISSmetrics infographics is a simple link before the infographic to link back to them as the source of the infographic. If you want to ensure that people link to you when embedding your infographic, let them know to do so. Better yet, include embed code that they can use to add the image to their website and link back to you quickly and easily.

How to Get the Link

Whether you get the link is hit or miss, but create a standard template like this.

Dear (insert blog owner / site owner’s name here),

We appreciate you sharing our infographic “(insert infographic title here)” with your audience. If it’s not too much trouble, we would like to ask to be credited by adding a link back to our infographic page at (insert link here).

Best regards,
(insert your name here)

It’s a simple, friendly email that should help you increase your chances of getting the link back for your infographic.

Get Links for Creative Commons Images on Other Sites

Another great way to get some links within content is by providing images for others to use on their blogs or website content. You can use Creative Commons images to get relevant links back to your website by making sure you create images that would most likely be used by other websites in your industry. Creative Commons licensing comes in a few forms, but essentially boils down to people getting to use your images (or other content) in exchange for giving you credit.

One place to find and place Creative Commons images is Flickr. You can use their advanced search to find Creative Commons licensed images with just about any theme. When I wrote a post on how to make money through blogging, I grabbed an image from one user’s photostream of a pile of money. I linked directly to the photo as credit, but later received an email from the owner of the photo who wanted me to link back to his website instead.

So how did he track me down, and how could you track down any uses of images you have set under Creative Commons licensing? Let’s take this image as an example from 401kcalculator.org.

creative-commons-image-example

To find people using this image, you can use the reverse image search on Google. Go to Google Images and click on the camera icon.

reverse-google-images-search

You can then either paste in a URL for the image or upload it directly from your computer. Then Google will go out and show you any pages that it finds with that image or similar.

pages-including-matching-images

Out of just the first 5 results, I found:

  • 4 sites using the image without any attribution link.
  • 1 site using the image and linking back to the Flickr user instead of their website.

I’d guess that there are a lot more link opportunities considering there were 344 total results for this image.

How to Optimize Creative Commons Images for Link Building

If you upload images to Flickr to be used on other sites with the Creative Commons license, it’s imperative to put your website link beneath each picture so that people know who to link to when they use it. The owner of the photo who contacted me didn’t have a link to his website anywhere on his photos or his Flickr profile which makes it a little difficult to do anything but credit his Flickr page.

How to Get the Link

Again, you can use a similar template for your request for attribution. Unlike infographics that sometimes aren’t as obvious as to why someone would need to credit you, Creative Commons does state that you must attribute the work in the manner specified by the author or licensor of the image. So you have some good back up.

Dear (insert blog owner / site owner’s name here),

We appreciate you using our image “(insert title here)” on your website at (insert link). Since this image is licensed as Creative Commons, we would appreciate a link back to our website at (insert link here) as per the terms of Creative Commons licensing.

Best regards,
(insert your name here)

Again, it’s a simple, friendly email that should help you increase your chances of getting the link back for your image.

There you have it – two great ways to reclaim even more links for image content you have created. Have you tried either of these approaches and, if so, what have been the results?